BELGRAVIA MAG: Belgravian

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FT-HTSI – Diary of a Somebody 2013

FT-HTSI – Diary of a Somebody 2013

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Press Archives
  • 2014 (2)
  • 2013 (7)
  • 2012 (1)
  • 2008 (5)
  • 2006 (4)
  • 2005 (4)
  • 2004 (7)
  • 2003 (9)
  • 2002 (5)
  • 2001 (3)
  • 2000 (2)
  • 1999 (3)
  • 1998 (8)
  • 1997 (1)
  • 1996 (3)
  • 1995 (3)
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  • 1993 (2)
  • 1992 (4)
  • 1991 (10)
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DAVID MURPHY – STUDIO VISIT

 

NATHALIE HAMBRO – NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES

 

 

Studio Visit

David Murphy

website

+
Galleria Monica De Cardenas
Chesa Albertini – Via Maistra 41
CH-7524 Zuoz – St.Moritz
+41 81 868 80 80
www.monicadecardenas.com
info@monicadecardenas.com

till  31 August

photos: nathalie hambro

 

David Murphy (b. 1983) is an emerging British sculptor who approaches his work with an instinctive sensitivity towards the innate textures and qualities of the materials at hand. In doing so, he creates visions of indistinguishable, yet familiar, living or moving forms. In this exhibition he presents new works on paper, gessoed board, and untreated wood. In addition, there are three new steel sculptures: two of which are to be seen on a floor or table, and one conceived of with this gallery’s garden in mind. The indoor sculptures are constructed from steel that is bent and woven through rings, the resultant object being a composition of coiled, concentric circles. The outdoor sculpture is a shallow three metre by two and-a-half metre grid of woven steel, which takes as its precedent the geometry and floor-bound work of Carl Andre, while suggesting the transplanted notion of a magnified textile weave. A coherent foil to the latter sculpture, the two-dimensional works often (and effectively) create the illusory effect of a moulded three-dimensional surface.

Murphy’s sculptures are like drawings in space, flattened by perspective – this play between line and volume, space and lightness, is central to his work. In these new pieces, his distinctive line is tempered by a softness and rhythm. These qualities inform his exploration of patterns that define and re-present the patterns integral to organic forms, particularly on the wooden boards. Furthermore, the works engage with the microcosm and macrocosm of structures found in nature, acting like a lens that zooms in and out of woven fabric, foliage, or cells, revealing hidden or invisible structures, while remaining essentially abstract.

The way Murphy incorporates colour into his studies of form, while subtle, is essential to our emotional engagement with the works: one can see his carefully selected palette of ‘in-between’ hues, such as a brownish yellow, reddish black and grey-blue. The source of his palette in this exhibition is noteworthy: the wall-hung works are applied using a wide, dry paintbrush, and with the same paint as is traditionally used on the facade of Engadiner houses. Murphy discovered this material when spending time in the area (he was included in a group exhibition YES/ Young English Sculptors at the Fundaziun Not Vital, Ardez, in August 2012). Thus Murphy, as an ‘outsider’, offers those familiar with the Engadin a fresh way to appreciate the local topography, and realize the wealth of inspiration that can be garnered from this place of extraordinary light and landscapes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IDRIS KHAN – BEYOND THE BLACK

 

NATHALIE HAMBRO – NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES

 

 

Idris Khan

Beyond the Black

Victoria Miro

16 Wharf Road, N1 7RW

September 20 till November 9



A new body of work by Idris Khan Beyond the Black, marks an important departure from Khan’s photographic based works and comprises a suite of large black paintings, a monumental site specific wall drawing and a series of works on paper, all of which consider the metaphysics of creativity.

In the exhibition’s seven paintings and one large wall drawing Khan uses a mixture of black pigment, rabbit skin glue and slate dust, to create an absorbent ground which he applies to aluminum panels or directly to the wall and then sands back to produce a smooth, slate-like surface. The paintings are intensely dark with a dense radial constellation of words creating an image that suggests a contained energy emanating from a central point.
Following on from earlier bodies of work in which he referenced the writings of Agnes Martin, Jean-Paul Sartre and early Sufi philosophers, these new works incorporate Khan’s own writings, inspired by his reading of Frederick Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy.

The works are gradually built up with strands of text applied on top of one another in red-black oil based paint. During the making of the works the glossy words disappear into the black ground surface until they become saturated to such an extent the words slip from tangibility into abstraction. This denial of legibility thwarts a basic human desire to understand and to establish meaning. The further we manage to see into the text the less easy it is to comprehend.

The writings that make up the canvas, wall and paper works in this exhibition have profound resonance for the artist and describe his approach to creating work. Some focus on visual details, while others have a more personal quality. However, for the viewer their full meaning is elusive. Khan appears to suggest that our linear experience of time and place has a more shadowy relationship with memory and the subconscious, and that they cannot be so easily grasped.

In thinking about these works Khan was also acutely aware of the great twentieth-century masters who worked with an intense, black on black palette, including Mark Rothko, Ad Reinhardt, Agnes Martin, Frank Stella and Richard Serra. Repetition and action have always been central to Khan’s practice along with a restricted set of processes. His earlier works touch on the subject of totality, photographing every page of the Koran, or overlaying every note of Beethoven’s sonatas to bring photography closer to painting. His more recent body of work saw him drawing on a chalkboard, repeatedly photographing his marks to an abstract state. This new work focuses on the repeated process of the hand and its direct contact with its surface.

Khan’s work is a continuous process of creating and erasing, or adding new layers whilst retaining traces of what has gone before. The large wall drawing, which will be created by the artist in situ in the gallery’s upper floor over a period of a month will consist of more than 120,000 lines of text, again forming a giant radial form.

Khan has commented: “Through repetition one is allowed other freedoms: perhaps that of thought outside of the words’ linguistic formulations and into abstract territory, that of drawing figures that might be letters in one time and pure nothings in another. The title Beyond the Black asks you to think of looking past the surface of the painting, past the existence of the words and through the work to the meaning of its creation.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

MARINA ABRAMOVIC INSTITUTE (MAI)



NATHALIE HAMBRO – NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES



5 reasons to support MARINA ABRAMOVIC INSTITUTE (MAI)

the artist explains.. VIDEO 1 Click here


MAI the mission… VIDEO 2


[vimeo clip_id=71082421 width=”500″]


Marina Abramović defies any attempts at cosy curtailment within genres. This is not by her own contrariness – she recently described herself as the “grandmother of performance art” – but rather because over more than three decades of creativity, her extraordinary work has flowered far beyond the remits of comfortable genre specification. She is fearless in using herself as a canvas and tool, stating that “once you enter into the performance state you can push your body to do things you absolutely could never normally do.” Vitally her work is a full frontal assault on the customary passivity of the audience – in Rhythm 0, 1974, she presented spectators with her inert body and a range of implements ranging from a rose to a gun with an invitation to them to stroke, manipulate, even hurt her submissive form; in The Artist is Present, 2010, she shared a period of silence with audience members who came to sit opposite her, a moment so profound that many participants were moved to tears.

Originally born in Serbia, Abramović moved to New York fourteen years ago, but a few years into her time there she began to feel that the frenzied energy of the city was exhausting her. In an exclusive video made by Derek Peck earlier this year, she described it as “almost like vampirism…I was looking for a place where I could go …just to hug a tree or sit by the river.” The place she found is 620 Columbia St., Hudson, NY, but it has been re-purposed from a hideaway into the future home of the Marina Abramović Institute (MAI), an interdisciplinary performance and education centre, home to long durational work and the Abramović Method. A revolutionary institution, like nothing that has existed before, the MAI will serve to record the history of performance art, and provide edification and space for students of the practice. This is an entirely unique project and one that has been set in motion by the work and finances of Abramović herself, yet it requires a significant sum to push it into reality. In order to ensure this, the MAI have created a Kickstarter campaign, asking fans of both Marina and long duration art to donate to the realization of the project. In return for donations of any amount, from $5 to $10,000, those who pledge will receive a portion of this extraordinary artistic endeavour. Here, as part of our campaign to help this come to fruition, Five good reasons why Marina deserves your support. With just 19 days to go to raise the $600,000 need to fund this fantastic foundation, we hope you agree.

The MAI will build a platform for international collaborations between individuals across a variety of disciplines. As the only international institute whose focus is the preservation and staging of long durational works, it will serve as a home for anyone wishing to participate in the exploration of long durational performance. It will guard against repetition in the form, the risk of young artists championing work as new that was actually first performed many years before. And by gaining knowledge of the past and the history of performance art, artists will gain the skills and education to create boundary pushing work in the future.

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